Empirically Based Programming

 

Assorted Outcome Studies

Over the years, FPS has demonstrated the effectiveness of its treatment and risk management approach in a number of program evaluation studies. Our clinical approach has received endorsement through both qualitative and quantitative research investigating the impact and outcome of treatment.

Noteworthy findings include:

  • 6% sexual recidivism rate over a 15-year follow up compared to a 25% recidivism rate of a matched comparison sample (Ellerby & Macpherson, 2002; O’Brien, Ellerby, Nicholaichuck, & Gu, 2002)
  • 9% recidivism for sexual offences for High Risk sexual offenders on probation over a three year period compared to the expected recidivism rate of 36% based on risk assessment normative data (Ellerby, 2007)
  • 15% recidivism rate for violent and sexual crimes for High Risk offenders on probation over a three year period compared to the expected recidivism rate of 43% based on risk assessment normative data (Ellerby, 2007)
  • Treatment completion rates for Aboriginal offenders increase significantly (to 88%) with the inclusion of traditional healing approaches (Ellerby, 1994; Ellerby, Bedard, & Chartrand, 2000)
  • Time in treatment at FPS was a significant factor in reduced risk while time in treatment in other sexual offender treatment programs was not (Rothman, 2007)
  • 52% of offenders in treatment stay connected to the treatment program following the expiry of their sentence and mandate to participate (Ellerby & Macpherson, 2002)
  • Community Integration Manager support time was viewed by parole/probation officers, mental health and family services workers, law enforcement officers, and offenders to be of significant benefit in monitoring risk, assisting case management and facilitating community integration (Ellerby & Christian, 2001)
  • The multisystemic team approach to risk management was viewed as being more effective and having several benefits compared to supervision and treatment that did not utilize a team approach (Ellerby & Nguyen, 2006)